Osteology
Archaeology » Archaeology methods » Osteology

Osteology is the scientific study of bones. A subdiscipline of anthropology and archeology, osteology is a detailed study of the structure of bones, skeletal elements, teeth, morphology, function, disease, pathology, the process of ossification (from cartilaginous molds), the resistance and hardness of bones (biophysics), etc. often used by scientists with identification of human remains with regard to age, death, sex, growth, and development in a biocultural context.

Osteology

The skull can be used to determine all of these particulars. However, often the skull is not available or it is not reliable due to deterioration, thus osteologists must use the bones available. Osteology can also help to determine the length of time since death.The first step of osteology is to have an understanding of the human skeleton. There are many terms and names to be familiar with.

There are two types of traits that are looked at when dealing with skeletal remains, metric and non-metric. Metric traits are the measured variations of bones. For instance, the length of a humerus (upper-arm bone) from one person may be slightly longer than that of another person who was the same size. Non-metric traits are the differences between individuals' bones that can not be measured. For instance, one person's bone may fuse differently than another person's.

Osteology Contains Following Chapter:

Osteology

Osteology methods
A typical analysis will include:
  • An inventory of the skeletal elements present
  • A dental inventory
  • Aging data, based upon epiphyseal fusion and dental eruption (for subadults) and deterioration of the pubic symphysis or sternal end of ribs (for adults)
  • Stature and other metric data
  • Ancestry
  • Non-metric traits
  • Pathology and/or cultural modifications


Osteology Applications

Osteological approaches are frequently applied to investigations in disciplines such as forensic science, physical anthropology and archaeology, and has a place in research on topics including:

  • Health
  • Demography
  • Diet
  • Disease
  • Activity patterns



There are two types of traits that are looked at when dealing with skeletal remains, metric and non-metric. Metric traits are the measured variations of bones. For instance, the length of a humerus (upper-arm bone) from one person may be slightly longer than that of another person who was the same size. Non-metric traits are the differences between individuals' bones that can not be measured. For instance, one person's bone may fuse differently than another person's.

These typical tools used in osteology are measuring instruments for metric measurements.One of the first steps in osteology is determining whether the skeletal remains are human or another animal. While there is variation in every being, human or animal, there are general similarities in every species. If the skull is not present, human bones can be distinguished from animals by shape, size, and density differences. Species determination can be very difficult if the bones are fragmented. However, familiarity with the human skeleton can help in most cases.

Osteology tools Osteology tools Osteology tools Osteology tools

Books on the Osteology:
Osteology  Osteology - A Concise Description of the Human Skeleton. Arthur Trehern Norton - 2010.

This is an EXACT reproduction of a book published before 1923. This IS NOT an OCR'd book with strange characters, introduced typographical errors, and jumbled words..

 
Human osteology & skeletal radiology:  Human osteology & skeletal radiology:- Evan W. Matshes - 2005.

Human Osteology and Skeletal Radiology: An Atlas and Guide features nearly 700 photographs, line drawings, and radiographs demonstrating individual bones, or collections of bones, from both a distant perspective and more detailed angles.

 
Human Osteology: In Archaeology and Forensic Science  Human Osteology: In Archaeology and Forensic Science:- Margaret Cox, Simon Mays - 2000.

Rich Resources over the web on Osteology
  • Osteology, is the scientific study of bones. A subdiscipline of anthropology and archeology, osteology is a detailed study of the structure of bones, skeletal elements, teeth, morphology, function, disease, pathology, the process of ossification (from cartilaginous molds), the resistance and hardness of bones (biophysics), etc.

  • Osteology : Osteology, the study of bones, is one of the most useful techniques for forensic anthropology available. The reason for this importance is that forensic anthropology deals with totally or partially skeletonized remains. It is through osteology that researchers can determine the age, sex, probable racial affiliation, and general stature of the person in life. The human skull is the most telling of all of the bones.

  • Osteology.org :The Osteology Foundation aims to promote research, apprenticeship and collaboration between universities and industry in the field of tissue regeneration with biological materials in the oral and maxillofacial area. The objective is to make new techniques and products available to practices more quickly and with greater goal orientation.

Diciplines by Regional study
  • African Archaeology

    African Archaeology Africa has the longest record of human activity of any part of the world and along with its geographical extent; it contains an enormous archaeological resource. Scholars have studied Egyptology for centuries but archaeologists have only paid serious attention to the rest of the continent in more recent times.
  • American Archaeology

    American Archaeology Archaeology of the Americas is the learning of the archaeology of North America, Central America (or Mesoamerica), South America and the Caribbean, which is to say, the pre-history and Pre-Columbian history of Native American peoples.
  • European archaeology

    European Archaeology In terms of area, Europe is the world's second smallest continent, with an area of 10,400,000 kmē (4,000,000 square miles), making it slightly larger than Australia.
  • Medival archaeology

    Medival archaeology The period covers the commotion caused by the fall of the Medival archaeology Roman Empire and cultures such as the Vikings, Saxons and Franks.
  • Near Eastern Archaeology

    Near Eastern Archaeology Near Eastern Archaeology is a wide generalised application, and is divided into further regional sub-branches, the archaeology of modern states in the region or along broad thematic lines.
  • Post Medieval Archaeology

    Post Medieval Archaeology The Post Medieval Archaeology is considered as a bi-annual journal study of the material evidence of European society. This period saw the conversion of medieval to industrial society.
  • Modern Archaeology

    Modern Archaeology In contrast to the antiquarianism of classical archaeology, anthropological archaeology today is concerned with culture history (i.e., the chronology of events and cultural traditions) and the explanation of cultural processes.


Ï Latest Archaeology Updates Ï Importance and applicability Ï Famous Archaeologists Ï Museums Collections Ï Site Map
Ï World Heritage Sites Ï World History Monuments Ï Archaeological Organizations Ï World Atlas of Archaeology Ï Forensic Investigation and Geophysics Ï Contact Us
Ï Movies based on Archaeology Ï Frequently Asked Questions Ï Archaeological discoveries Ï Tell a Friend
Ï Archaeological Abbreviations Ï Gallery Collections Ï Famous-Museums site map Ï Famous-archaeologists site map Ï Archaeological Monuments site map
Copyright © Greatarchaeology 2019