Paleopathology
Archaeology » Archaeology methods » Paleopathology

Paleopathology Paleopathology, also spelled palaeopathology, is the study of ancient diseases. It is useful in understanding the past history of diseases, and uses this understanding to predict its course in the future.

From the Renaissance to the mid nineteenth century, there was increasing reference to ancient disease, initially within prehistoric animals although later the importance of studying the antiquity of human disease began to be emphasised. The true genesis of the field of human palaeopathology is generally considered to occur between the mid nineteenth century and World War I when a number of pioneering physicians and anthropologists clarified the medical nature of ancient skeletal pathologies.

Paleopathology

This included a review of human paleopathology published by H.U. Williams in 1929 and a book published by Pales in 1930 on paleopathology and comparative pathology. This work was consolidated between the world wars with methods such as radiology, histology and serology being applied more frequently, improving diagnosis and accuracy with the introduction of statistical analysis. It was at this point that palaeopathology can truly be considered to have become a scientific discipline.

After World War II palaeopathology began to be viewed in a different way: as an important tool for the understanding of past populations, and it was at this stage that the discipline began to be related to epidemiology and demography. The study of DNA also began to add new information to what was already known about ancient disease.

Paleopathalogy

Paleopathology Contains Following Chapter:

Human Osteopathology is classified into several general groups:
  • Arthropathy
  • Infection
  • Trauma
  • Tumor
Arthropathy

Although the terms "arthropathy" and arthritis have very similar meanings, the former is traditionally used to describe the following conditions:

  • Reactive arthropathy (M02-M03) is caused by an infection, but not a direct infection of the synovial space. (See also Reactive arthritis)
  • Enteropathic arthropathy (M07) is caused by colitis and related conditions.
  • Crystal arthropathy (also known as crystal arthritis) (M10-M11) involves the deposition of crystals in the joint.
  • Diabetic arthropathy (M14.2, E10-E14) is caused by diabetes.
  • Neuropathic arthropathy (M14.6) is associated with a loss of sensation.

Infection

An infection is the colonization of a host organism by parasite species. Infecting parasites seek to use the host's resources to reproduce, often resulting in disease. Colloquially, infections are usually considered to be caused by microscopic organisms or microparasites like viruses, prions, bacteria, and viroids, though larger organisms like macroparasites and fungi can also infect.

Trauma

Trauma refers to a body wound or shock produced by sudden physical injury, as from violence or accident.Trauma is the sixth leading cause of death worldwide, accounting for 10% of all mortality, and is a serious public health problem with significant social and economic costs.

Tumor

A tumor or tumour is the name for a neoplasm or a solid lesion formed by an abnormal growth of cells which looks like a swelling.Tumor is not synonymous with cancer. A tumor can be benign, pre-malignant or malignant, whereas cancer is by definition malignant.



In archaeology, the study of the diseases of animals has not been as wide and extensive as those of humans. Baker and Brothwell’s seminal work was published in 1980 and is still considered a classic text, being frequently referred to within the discipline. However, this position of importance has largely come about, not because of its comprehensive coverage, but because there has been no real alternative.

Most palaeopathological literature is to be found in periodicals or compiled publications of conference papers. No synthesis of the research in the field as a whole has been attempted for the last twenty-five years. The study of dinosaur paleopathology has undergone a resurgence in the past two decades. An extensive bibliography of dinosaur paleopathology was released in 2002.

Paleopathalogy tools Paleopathalogy tools Paleopathalogy tools Paleopathalogy tools

Books on the Paleopathology:
paleopathology  The Cambridge encyclopedia of human paleopathology - Arthur C. Aufderheide, Conrado Rodríguez-Martín, Odin Langsjoen - 1998.

Uniquely, diseases affecting the soft tissues are also included as these are commonly present in mummified remains..

 
Paleopathology  Paleopathology:- Books, LLC 2010.

This included a review of human paleopathology published by H.U. Williams in 1929 and a book published by Pales in 1930 on paleopathology and comparative pathology.

 

Rich Resources over the web on Paleopathology
  • Paleopathology, also spelled palaeopathology, is the study of ancient diseases. It is useful in understanding the past history of diseases, and uses this understanding to predict its course in the future.

  • South Dakota Paleopathology : To facilitate exchange of information about skeletal pathology, we hope to build a substantial paleopathology database accessible on the web.

Diciplines by Regional study
  • African Archaeology

    African Archaeology Africa has the longest record of human activity of any part of the world and along with its geographical extent; it contains an enormous archaeological resource. Scholars have studied Egyptology for centuries but archaeologists have only paid serious attention to the rest of the continent in more recent times.
  • American Archaeology

    American Archaeology Archaeology of the Americas is the learning of the archaeology of North America, Central America (or Mesoamerica), South America and the Caribbean, which is to say, the pre-history and Pre-Columbian history of Native American peoples.
  • European archaeology

    European Archaeology In terms of area, Europe is the world's second smallest continent, with an area of 10,400,000 km² (4,000,000 square miles), making it slightly larger than Australia.
  • Medival archaeology

    Medival archaeology The period covers the commotion caused by the fall of the Medival archaeology Roman Empire and cultures such as the Vikings, Saxons and Franks.
  • Near Eastern Archaeology

    Near Eastern Archaeology Near Eastern Archaeology is a wide generalised application, and is divided into further regional sub-branches, the archaeology of modern states in the region or along broad thematic lines.
  • Post Medieval Archaeology

    Post Medieval Archaeology The Post Medieval Archaeology is considered as a bi-annual journal study of the material evidence of European society. This period saw the conversion of medieval to industrial society.
  • Modern Archaeology

    Modern Archaeology In contrast to the antiquarianism of classical archaeology, anthropological archaeology today is concerned with culture history (i.e., the chronology of events and cultural traditions) and the explanation of cultural processes.


Ï Latest Archaeology Updates Ï Importance and applicability Ï Famous Archaeologists Ï Museums Collections Ï Site Map
Ï World Heritage Sites Ï World History Monuments Ï Archaeological Organizations Ï World Atlas of Archaeology Ï Forensic Investigation and Geophysics Ï Contact Us
Ï Movies based on Archaeology Ï Frequently Asked Questions Ï Archaeological discoveries Ï Tell a Friend
Ï Archaeological Abbreviations Ï Gallery Collections Ï Famous-Museums site map Ï Famous-archaeologists site map Ï Archaeological Monuments site map
Copyright © Greatarchaeology 2018